BROADLEAF NEIGHBORS

Issue 8, Summer 2020
Photo by John F. Williams

BROADLEAF NEIGHBORS

Issue 8, Summer 2020

Though the Pacific Northwest is know for its evergreens, there are some broadleaf trees here that are both important and impressive. In this issue we’ll look at three of the most common trees: Red Alders, Pacific Madrone, and Bigleaf Maples.

In keeping with Salish Magazine’s tradition, these articles address some of the ways that these trees relate to the larger ecosystem: what they prefer, what they contribute, and what relationships they have.

There are also relationships between the articles. For example, the two articles about red alders both touch on the role alders play in nitrogen fixing. Those two articles each link to a third article which talks about what nitrogen fixing is all about.

There are also two articles that take different looks at the Pacific Madrone, one of our more unusual looking trees that keeps its leaves during the winter.

In keeping with our new practice of releasing content between quarterly issues, in the coming weeks there will also be a photo essay about our Bigleaf Maple and some poetry.

publisher’s note

We hope you’ve been enjoying the Virtual Explorations that we’ve been publishing weekly — bringing our local outdoors to you while this pandemic has been keeping people close to home. As of 9 June we have 20 of them online, with more to come.

We are also beginning to up our game in terms of making Salish Magazine more interactive — to take advantage of some of the handy features that really distinguish online publications from printed ones.

For example, we have already been using hyperlinks to allow some things on the page to link to other pages. Text that is a hyperlink is blue, for example: this links to our homepage

Check out our new feature!

Beginning with this issue’s article In the Company of Alders, we’re introducing occasional “tooltips” into the text. When you hover over text that is colored dark orange, like this, a small box will pop up with some additional information. If you’re using a touch-screen, then touch the orange text.

Since these tooltips are something new for us, let us know what you think. We’d like to introduce tooltips to more articles, but before we do we’d like to hear from you. How should we mark the text that has a tooltip? Is the dark orange text obvious enough? Or maybe a colored background would be better? Or too distracting? Should words and terms defined with tooltips also appear in a glossary, or is that going overboard? Any other thoughts?

Contact us via the CONNECT menu above and let us know what you think.

Table of Contents

Poetry-8

Poetry-8

by Nancy Taylor
Summer 2020

The theme for this issue is Broadleaf Trees, and for that we have a poem, “Ode to Madrona: Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, WA 2019

Hardwood & Winter Leaves

Hardwood & Winter Leaves

by Kristopher Clark
Summer 2020

The madrona tree stands out from other trees as is Washington State’s only broad-leaved evergreen tree with vibrant orange-red outer layers of bark.

Red Alder

Red Alder

by Thomas & Sara Noland
Summer 2020

Call it a weed tree if you want, but red alder roots build nutrients in the soil, its bark and twigs provide food for wildlife, its fallen leaves and branches create a blanket of rich mulch on the forest floor.

Factories Underfoot

Factories Underfoot

by Adelia Ritchie
Summer 2020

What do we mean when we say that some plants are “nitrogen fixers”? No, it doesn’t mean that they are repairing nitrogen! Let’s take a look at this hugely important subject.

In the Company of Alders

In the Company of Alders

by Phoebe Goit
Summer 2020

Lacking the magnificence of the cedar or the great presence of a Douglas fir or grand fir, the easily recognized alder tree is not considered very impressive by most locals. It’s just an alder.

The Pacific Madrone

The Pacific Madrone

by Gerald Young
Summer 2020

Long known, admired, and utilized by indigenous people, the madrona must deal with a rapidly changing climate and changes caused by human activities.

Salish Magazine

Publisher: John F. Williams

Assistant Editor: Adelia Ritchie

This magazine is a nonprofit project of:

SEA-Media

P.O. Box 1407 Suquamish WA 98392

info@sea-media.org    www.salishmagazine.org

Copyright SEA-Media, 2020

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without consent of copyright owner is strictly prohibited.
SEA-Media is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation

 

Extra special thanks to: Susan W. Merrill, Sheila Kelley, Kathleen Thorne, Phillip Rosaaen, and all of the credited authors and image contributors.

Sincere thanks also to our Patreon patrons: Craig Jacobrown, Sara Wade, Beverly Parsons, Phillis Carey, Tena and Earl Doan, John Willett, and Kay Oh

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