BIRDS: LARGE AND SMALL

Issue 6, Winter 2019
Photo by John F. Williams

BIRDS: LARGE AND SMALL

Issue 6, Winter 2019

 WELCOME TO THE WINTER 2019

ISSUE OF SALISH MAGAZINE!

Photo by John F. Williams

After spending two decades exploring underwater in Puget Sound, I broadened my perspectives and began to explore our local forests. I was immediately shocked to discover just how few animals were to be seen on a typical walk in the woods.

My expectations were perhaps skewed by the abundance of visible animal life in Puget Sound, particularly around structures such as rocks, walls, piers, and reefs. But even in flat, sedimented areas, animals could be seen, from tubeworms to crabs, shellfish to sea stars.

But I slowly realized that forests are much more plant and fungi based, though there are animals associated with the forests. Some of these animals have been pointed out in previous issues of Salish Magazine, and this issue focuses on one kind of animal that is perhaps the most often seen or heard in the Salish Sea region: birds. While many other animals hide underground, inside trees, or in other shelters, birds seem to understand that their ability to travel in three dimensions means that they don’t have to be hiding so much of the time. Distance from people seems to be enough.

There are many different bird species in this region, and this issue just scratches the surface with articles about some of the largest and smallest:

  • snow geese
  • great blue herons
  • purple martins
  • barn swallows

and briefer mentions of some of our wetland dwellers.

Photo by John F. Williams

In the last issue (#5, Autumn 2019), we experimented by adding an additional article between the quarterly release dates. This seems to have been welcomed by our readers, so we’ll do something similar this time. Between the initial release of this issue (#6, Winter 2019) and the release of #7 (Spring 2020), we will offer more articles on the topic of birds. These will include seabirds, citizen science, and hummingbirds.

We will send out newsletters announcing these additional articles, so if you haven’t subscribed to our newsletter list, use the Connect menu to visit our signup page.

 

Photo by Lee Tenneboe

Table of Contents

Birds of Bufflehead Pond

Birds of Bufflehead Pond

by Adelia Ritchie
Winter, 2019

The two main characters at Bufflehead Pond Farm who keep everything functioning smoothly are Mr. Buffle as President, and Mr. Redwing as CEO.

Purple Martins

Purple Martins

by Gene Bullock
Winter, 2019

Purple Martins are the largest members of the swallow family, and live mostly on insects such as flies and wasps, which they scoop up in flight.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

by Nancy Sefton
Winter 2019

On the Salish shoreline look for this tall grey-blue bird with a scissor-like beak. You may even glimpse one with its long stick legs on a floating bed of kelp.

Poems-6

Poems-6

by assorted poets
Winter 2019

Six poems by local poets about birds found in our Salish Sea region. Most are subjects of articles in this issue, but an eagle and crow also appear.

The Russians Are Coming

The Russians Are Coming

by Paul Pegany
Winter 2019

The rain and chill of Autumn settles heralds the annual migration of Snow Geese from Russia to one of their favorite winter hangouts—Skagit Valley.

Editorial-6

Editorial-6

by Adelia Ritchie
Winter, 2019

While on vacation in Costa Rica recently, I walked the city of San José one morning and visited a famous museum of pre-Colombian civilization.

Foto Tour 2

Foto Tour 2

by Expedition Participants
Winter 2019

Here are 15 selected photos submitted by participants of the Second Forest Foto Expedition offered by Kitsap’s WSU Extension on September 18, 2019.

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallow

by Adelia Ritchie
Winter, 2019

Barn swallows are extremely agile flyers. Each one can scoop up mosquitoes, flies, gnats and other flying insects at a rate of 60 bugs per hour!

Seabirds Are Cool

Seabirds Are Cool

by Julia Parrish
Winter 2019

The seabirds of the surf zone that always capture my imagination are in the Alcid family: murres, murrelets, guillemots, auklets and puffins. 

Salish Magazine

Publisher: John F. Williams

Editor: Adelia Ritchie

This magazine is a nonprofit project of:

SEA-Media

P.O. Box 1407 Suquamish WA 98392

info@sea-media.org    www.salishmagazine.org

Copyright SEA-Media, 2019.

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without consent of copyright owner is strictly prohibited.
SEA-Media is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation

 

Extra special thanks to: Susan Merril, Sheila Kelley, Kathleen Thorne, and all of the credited authors and image contributors.

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