WETLANDS

Issue 9, Autumn 2020
Photo by John F. Williams

WETLANDS

Issue 9, Autumn 2020

WELCOME TO THE FALL 2020

ISSUE OF SALISH MAGAZINE!

Adelia Ritchie, Managing Editor

We’re very proud to welcome you to the first issue of our third year! To celebrate this milestone, we’ve dipped our toes into one of the more prevalent, visible and important features of our Salish Sea area — wetlands.

When I was a child, I used to consider swamps and bogs as icky, smelly wastelands, soon to be filled in to become farmland or dry ground for building new houses. But after reading Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, as a teenager I began to understand the importance of these teeming damp places so full of interesting life forms. And as climate change began to slither across our planet, wetlands became even more important for recycling and storing carbon in the deep.

In this issue you’ll discover the incredible beauty of some of our local wetland areas that you can explore, whether on foot or by kayak. But before you put on those waders, this issue will also give you an appreciation for how and why wetlands are vital to all life in this area. You can read about all the different types of wetlands (swamps, bogs, ponds, estuaries, and more), the lifeforms they support, and how they function to maintain life as we know it.

Photo by Adelia Ritchie

This issue also features several of our region’s most gifted poets and artists who were inspired by some aspect of wetland life.

We have lots of additional articles on this topic coming over the next few weeks. These will include restoration work at Carpenter Creek, our area’s geologic past that can be seen in boggy sediments, some fun thoughts about duckweed, preservation of wetlands, and fun facts about newts! We will send out newsletters announcing these additional articles, so if you haven’t subscribed to our newsletter list, use the Connect menu to visit our signup page.

With all these articles and your own explorations and observations, we hope you will come to the same conclusion that I have, that every slimy creature, dragonfly, bullrush, fish, and seaweed bit is connected to every other creature in some way, and without them, there could be no life on Planet Earth.

Table of Contents

From Swamps and Bogs …

From Swamps and Bogs …

by Sara & Tom Noland
Autumn 2020

Anyone who’s walked around in a park or forest has probably spotted some familiar wetland signs: a pond where tree frogs chorus in the spring, or a patch of skunk cabbage in a shady glade.

Issue 9 Art Poetry

Issue 9 Art Poetry

by Assorted Poets & Artists
Autumn 2020

Wetlands are home and a transitional habitat for a variety of creatures, anadromous, amphibian, plant, etc. Here is some poetry and art that celebrate wetland creatures.

Carpenter Creek Salt Marsh

Carpenter Creek Salt Marsh

by Melissa Fleming & Terry Pereida
Autumn 2020

The salt marsh in the Carpenter Creek estuary reveals the complex interplay of tidal influence and freshwater input that characterize a natural estuary in the Pacific Northwest.

The Importance of Wetlands

The Importance of Wetlands

by Josh Wozniak
Autumn 2020

Taking many forms, wetlands are natural features of the landscape that provide crucial functions for both nature and humankind. We benefit directly from some of these functions.

Wetland Basics

Wetland Basics

by Frank Stricklin
Autumn 2020

Whether you call them a pond or a swamp, these shallow waters are teeming with the ebb and flow of life. There we can pause, contemplate, and observe a diverse array of wildlife and plants.

Blue Carbon

Blue Carbon

by Adelia Ritchie
Autumn 2020

Not just a lovely place for a nature walk, wetland ecosystems protect us from floods, provide nursery grounds for marine life, and are among the world’s most productive ecosystems.

Salish Magazine

Publisher: John F. Williams

Managing Editor: Adelia Ritchie

This magazine is a nonprofit project of:

SEA-Media

P.O. Box 1407 Suquamish WA 98392

info@sea-media.org    www.salishmagazine.org

Copyright SEA-Media, 2020

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without consent of copyright owner is strictly prohibited.
SEA-Media is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation

 

Extra special thanks to: Susan W. Merrill, Sheila Kelley, Kathleen Thorne, Phillip Rosaaen, and all of the credited authors and image contributors.

Sincere thanks also to our Patreon patrons: Sara Wade, Barbara Brooking, Melissa Fleming, Beverly Parsons, Phillis Carey, Tena and Earl Doan, John Willett, and Kay Oh

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In case you hadn’t noticed, Salish Magazine contains no advertisements to distract from the stories we bring you about our natural world. But the costs of producing and delivering the magazine have to be paid somehow.