Welcome to the inaugural issue of Salish Magazine!

The articles herein will unlock some of the mysteries of our intertidal zone, here in the Salish Sea.

This summer (2019), the tides will be extremely low for several days on either side of July 4th, with more lows again in mid and late-July, and in August. Check your favorite source for tidal predictions. If you don’t already have a favorite, a simple one for Seattle is published by Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife. Of course the low tide times vary by an hour or more around the region, and one place that tide times for specific places around Washington can be found is on the NOAA Tides & Currents site. Tides for British Columbia locations can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada site.

 

Seeing Stars?

Seeing Stars?

by Jeanne Wright, Nancy Sefton

September 2018

Several kinds colorful sea star species can be seen on our shores at low tide, but to see them you need to go underwater or visit our shores at low tide.

Mussel Strength

Mussel Strength

by Jill Needham, Kathleen Alcala

September 2018

Mussels have adapted a novel way of rooting themselves in place where they feed on free floating plankton and other microscopic sea creatures.

Big Boulders

Big Boulders

by Greg Geehan, John F. Williams

September 2018

Imagine a huge glacier thousands of feet thick slowly grinding its way into our region, carrying all sorts and sizes of stuff it picked up along the way.

The Barnacle

The Barnacle

by Tasha Smith, Leigh Calvez, Deb Rudnick

September 2018

From hard, circular pyramid-shaped shells, six pairs of feathery, olive green legs, swept through the salt water around them, feeling for a meal.

Flower of the Tide Pool

Flower of the Tide Pool

by Briana Sandoval, Sharon Pegany

September 2018

Aggregating anemones are commonly found at low tide around the Salish Sea, particularly in areas with hard surfaces, such as large rocks or abandoned structures.

Postscript-1

Postscript-1

by John F. Williams

September 2018

One of the big goals of this magazine is to help introduce a better sense of the “system” in ecosystem into our culture.

What is the Salish Sea?

The SeaDoc Society describes the Salish Sea as: “an inland sea that encompasses Puget Sound, the San Juan Islands and the waters off of Vancouver, BC. The area spans from Olympia, Washington in the south to the Campbell River, British Columbia in the north, and west to Neah Bay and includes the large cities of Seattle and Vancouver.”
We chose this area because it offers wide diversity with a “local” feel. In other words, while it encompasses marine, fresh water, and forest habitats, there is a similarity in the way the lowland forests surround relatively protected marine waters, and are fed by fresh water sources.
So when you read an article about conifers, sand dollars, feeder bluffs, trilliums, sea stars, or other local topics, the items described can be found in many places around the Salish Sea — so all of us here in the Salish Sea region have an opportunity to see these things first-hand.

Map Courtesy of The Nature Conservancy / Erica Simek Sloniker

Salish Magazine

Publisher: John F. Williams

SEA-Media
P.O. Box 1407 Suquamish WA 98392
info@sea-media.org www.salishmagazine.org
Copyright SEA-Media, 2018.

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without consent of copyright owner is strictly prohibited.
SEA-Media is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation

 

Extra special thanks to: Susan Merril, Courtney Cole-Faso, Sheila Kelley, Kathleen Thorne, Georgia Browne, Tom McDonald, Jenise Bauman, Bob Simmons, Neva Welton, and all of the credited authors and image contributors.

 

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SALISH MAGAZINE

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