REPURPOSED TREE FARMS

Issue 2, Winter 2018

REPURPOSED TREE FARMS

Issue 2, Summer 2019

not too long ago, industrial tree farms were the dominant forest type in the salish sea lowlands

Now, as you walk trails in our forests, you can see the “look” of the forest occasionally change — ​in both space and time.

In the articles listed below, you can learn stories behind those different “looks” and about some of the fascinating things you can see in our regional forests: from very visible things like owls and stumps, to more abstract things like evidence of forest ecosystem processes.​​

Forest Stages

Forest Stages

If you’ve walked through one of the many public forested areas around Puget Sound, you may have noticed the “look” of the forest change as you followed a path. If you haven’t noticed different forest “looks,” keep you eyes peeled next time you venture into the forest.

Who Cooks

Who Cooks

Barred owls are quite striking. The dish-shaped face first captures the owler’s attention with large, dark, knowing eyes and a sharp yellow beak. Brown and white concentric circles frame the face, while horizontal bars create a hood-like pattern over the head and neck.

Why Thin

Why Thin

If you’ve walked through one of the many public forested areas around Puget Sound, you may have noticed the “look” of the forest change suddenly as you followed a path. If you haven’t noticed different forest “looks,” keep you eyes peeled next time you venture into the forest.

Stump Stories

Stump Stories

Where trees have been harvested, dead wood normally found in forests is largely missing. In our retired tree farms, ecosystem functions that would be performed by fallen trees are entrusted mainly to the big stumps that you may see scattered throughout the forest.

Rings

Rings

A common reason for us informal explorers to look at the rings on a cut tree is to learn how old the trees are in that neck of the woods. Like people, a tree’s age cannot be judged simply by its size — there are too many variables. But rings show the age, and other things too.

Nurse Log

Nurse Log

​In some of the more charming places, trees and decaying stumps lie on the forest floor in the midst of their thriving offspring. Much like beloved elders gone before, the trees on the ground have given up active living, but are still very much present in other ways.

Map-2

Map-2

Here’s a map of the Salish Sea region with some landmarks highlighted that are relevant to this issue. We also extend to you an invite for your to send us photos & information about additional landmarks you have have visited so that we can add them to the map.

Salish Magazine

Publisher: John F. Williams

Other Valuable Assistance: The list is long but distinguished

SEA-Media P.O. Box 1407 Suquamish WA 98392

info@sea-media.org www.salishmagazine.org

Copyright SEA-Media, 2018. All rights reserved.

Reproduction in whole or in part without consent of copyright owner is strictly prohibited.
SEA-Media is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation

Very Special Thanks to all of the authors, donors, and photographers, as well as:
Courtney Cole-Faso

Sheila Kelley

Susan Merrill

Kathleen Thorne

Neva Welton

 

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